Antibiotic Use

The use of antibiotics can be traced all the way back to ancient times when cultures such as the ancient Greeks and the ancient Indians used extracts from pillplants to treat open wounds and multiple infections. Today, antibiotics are created similarly with substances from microorganisms that have the ability to kill other bacteria or control the rate at which they grow.

The breaking point in the discovery and creation of antibiotics came in 1921 when Scottish biologist Sir Alexander Fleming discovered enzyme lysozyme and one of the main components in the antibiotic, penicillin. Seven years later, Flemings research lead him to reveal that Penicillin was successful in killing influenza bacteria, which to this day affects thousands of individuals.

Antibiotics work in either one of two ways. Bacteria in the body that hinders the formation of bacterium’s cell walls or the contents of a cell are treated with Bactericidal antibiotics. The other type of antibiotic, Bacteriostatic antibiotics, ceases bacteria from multiply, stopping infections in their tracks.

While antibiotics prevent, manage, and treat bacteria that cause numerous or infections that affect an individual’s overall health, there is one major risk in relation to antibiotics.

The Link between Antibiotics and Cancer

Research has provided evidence that increasing cumulative days of antibiotic use were associated with increased risk of incident cancer. Christine Velicer’s PhD., 2004 case control study of 2,266 women yielded that the use of antibiotics may increase the risk of cancer through effects on immune function, inflammation, and metabolism. This risk was observed in all antibiotic classes studied. According to the CDC, tens of millions of antibiotics are prescribed for viral infections that are not treatable with antibiotics. This contributes heavily to the troubling growth of antibiotic resistance (1).

A possible explanation as to why antibiotics may cause cancer can be associated with the fact that the prescription interferes with cells (just as it does bacteria) in our bodies that protect us from cancer.

The next time you encounter an infection, consider this risk. Is the use of antibiotics worth the even bigger risk of a life threatening disease?

Natural Prevention and Treatment in Red Bank NJ

Many of you now may be considering alternative approaches to treating infections that affect our bodies. Our multidisciplinary facility in Red Bank New Jersey offers treatments that are natural and effective. The Pain Management department believes strongly that the body is fully capable of healing itself. That is why we use other types of rehabilitation to avoid unnecessary use of medications. Monmouth Pain and Rehabilitation’s facility in Red Bank New Jersey uses rehabilitation to treat not only pain, but infections that take a toll on our immune systems as well. Chiropractic and physical therapy treatment can correct nervous system disruptions by adjusting spinal misalignments and focus on returning your immune responses to the way the body always intended. Acupuncture works to ensure the immune system is not weakened in any way and keeps the body balanced and at peace. Our Medical Weight Loss program reduces inflammation (which often occurs in the lungs during influenza infections) by targeting fat loss to help our patients not only look better, but feel better too. Using multiple treatment methods together such as chiropractic and acupuncture can work effectively together to boost immunity that prevents infection and helps heal once the infection sets it. All of our treatments are put into place to assist our patients in returning to a healthy lifestyle.

Contact us to find out more about how Monmouth Pain and Rehabilitation in Red Bank NJ can help you avoid the use of antibiotics when infection occurs

  • Antibiotic Use in Relation to the Risk of Breast Cancer Christine M. Velicer, PhD; JAMA. 2004;291:827-835.
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